Jewish New Year

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“Happy is the man who does not forget You and the son of man makes an effort in You.”

In this happy and optimistic letter for the New Year that Rabbi Baruch Shalom Ashlag wrote  to his friends and students in the Beit Hamidrash for Rosh Hashanah, he teaches that the themes of Rosh Hashanah are actually advice the Sages are giving us in how to come closer to our Creator.

May we all be blessed with a sweet, happy and healthy year full of goodness for each one of us , our families and the family of Mankind, Yedidah Cohen

This podcast is dedicated for a Refuah Shlemah to Rafael ben Chaya Rosa . May all the sick have a complete healing this year.

Taken from “Mictavim Rabbi  Baruch Shalom  Ashlag” Mictav 10

Further talks on  Teshuvah and Rosh hashanah

Forty days of love: From Elul to Yom Kippur

Coming back home: The shofar’s call

The language of Rosh Hashanah is derived from the Kabbalah

The Shofar, the sound of compassion

Changing our outlook on Rosh HaShanah

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Rosh Hashanah ; the festival of choice

by yedidah on September 13, 2015

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Rosh HaShanah, the new year is a day of choice; a day when we are given the possibility of choosing again. This is an amazing thought. For so many of us, the days go by and we seem to have drifted into habits of thought, feeling and even actions, which on closer examination we may not in fact espouse.
So what does this new choice consist of, and how do we choose?
As the Sages teach us, we are made up of body and soul. The body aspect of ourselves is actually the framework of the ego, called by Rabbi Ashlag, “the will to receive for oneself alone.” He calls it that, because this title actually describes its basic nature. The ego expresses itself through desires to benefit itself. These desires then beget needs, and needs beget thoughts and actions how to fulfill these needs. This framework of the ego can be so compelling that we even say of a person that  ” he or she is governed by his or her ego.”

The other aspect of ourselves is the soul. This is characterized by the desire to give compassionately, and unconditionally. The soul is of the same essence as that of God,  the Creator, whose desire is only that of giving. This soul is also given to us, as we say every morning, “Oh my God, the soul that you gave me is pure, you created it, you formed it, and you breathed it into me.” The acknowledgement of the soul is the acknowledgement of the godliness within us . The more we acknowledge the godliness within us  the more power we  give to the potential of the soul to govern our  thoughts, actions and speech rather than giving away this power unthinkingly to the ego.
So the choice each one of us is given to chose again on the day of Rosh Hashanah   is which governance do I chose? The governance of the ego or the governance of the soul?

It is this question that finds expression in the concept of God as King on Rosh haShanah. Can we make Him the governor of our own selves?

Shanah Tovah to you all, for a sweet New Year, Yedidah

Podcast inspired  by  article 6 taken from the Sefer Hama’amarim of Rabbi Baruch Shalom Ashlag, תשמ”ט

Other talks for Rosh Hashanah can be found here

The language of Rosh Hashanah is derived from the Kabbalah

The Shofar, the sound of compassion

Changing our outlook on Rosh HaShanah

 

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The language of Rosh HaShanah derives from the Kabbalah

by yedidah September 3, 2012
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The language surrounding Rosh haShanah is imbued with connotations from the Kabalah.By looking at the true meaning of the symbols of this festival we can approach it with happiness and confidence .

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