consciousness

The Torah in balance, from the writings of Rabbi Ashlag

Torah: a Source of Balance

by yedidah on June 22, 2016

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The Torah was given to the Children of Israel in the month of Sivan, in the third month of coming out of Egypt.

The holy Zohar takes this to hint to us that the Torah itself comes forth in the middle line of consciousness, combining within itself both the consciousness of Chesed, lovingkindness, and of Gevurah, strength, and bringing forth a consciousness of harmony and balance.

What does this mean for our service of God? Why do I need the Torah?

We have within ourselves two polar states of consciousness, that of giving and that of receiving. Giving unconditionally is a consciousness that is in affinity of form with the Creator, whereas our vessels of receiving from the Creator actually separate us from Him, even though these  are the vessels with which, eventually,we will be able to receive all the goodness that God wants to give us. Eventually these two opposite forms need to come to a harmonious consciousness of the middle line.

This process of coming to our middle line, is a process called forth by the Torah, the revelation of God’s wisdom.

This podcast is dedicated in love to all those souls who can and are ready to have more clarity in their lives and to shed the obstructions that hold them back from recognizing their own divinity . Especially dedicated to Yehudah ben Esther, and Kalman Roen ben Feige Tziporah

Podcast inspired by Article 19 from Sefer HaMama’arim volume 4 תש”ן 

 

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God spoke to Abraham and Abraham heard

And God spoke to Avraham

by yedidah on November 6, 2014

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And God spoke to Abraham.

Since the flood, silence. God had not revealed himself to mankind again. What was He waiting for?

On the finish of the Creation, the words of the Torah are, vayhal  Elohim, “and God finished”  But the Holy Or HaChaim, Rabbi Ibn Atar, tells us that these words also have the connotation of God “yearning” for Man.  What was He yearning for?

The answer comes when we consider why God spoke to Abraham. What made Abraham different from all the other members of his generation that God should speak to Him?  Even more poignant is the question is, in what way had Abraham prepared himself so he heard the voice of God? Why does the advent of Abraham mark a new beginning for mankind, a new consciousness, to the extent that the Torah suggests that the entire Creation was waiting for his coming ?

As we study the Zohar on this question, we begin to understand how to  discover our own inner Abraham.

My thanks to my Chevruta Leah Weinstein pointing out the Perush of the Or haChayim; and to my Chevruta Jodie Lebowitz who patiently learned the sources with me.

Zohar from Perush haSulam Lech Lecha, paragraph 1

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I am for my Beloved, and my Beloved is for me.

by yedidah September 8, 2014
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Our relationship with God is a dialogue. Our thoughts, words and actions, and, even more, our intentions affect this most intimate of our relationships profoundly. Nowhere is this dialogue seen more clearly than at this time of the year, when “the King is in the field” and our soul is close to us. From an oral talk by Rabbi Ashlag given to his students.

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The natural forces of Creation and how man’s consciousness affects them: From the Zohar

by yedidah October 31, 2012
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Hurricane Sandy hit the coast of America this week. The Zohar discusses Man’s relationship with nature and the forces of Creation, and we learn how the consciousness of the human being is a prime factor in influencing the behavior of natural forces. Keep safe. we’re thinking of you…. (Inspired  by  a talk  given by Rabbi […]

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Teshuvah- Coming back to our true selves

by yedidah September 20, 2012
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We are now in the days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur when the theme of Teshuvah reaches its height. Teshuvah is a God-given gift to us calling us back, showing us the way home. Often translated as repentance it really means “returning to our inner selves”. By the Sages, the term Teshuvah not only […]

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